admission

Signing the Law Society Roll Book

Posted on Updated on

DiefenbakerRollsm
John Diefenbaker’s signature in the Law Society Roll Book, signed June 30, 1919
rollspine
Roll Book Spine with Embossed Title

It is that time of the year again! The students who have completed the Bar Admissions Program will be eligible for admission as lawyers. Those admitted will be required to sign the roll at the Law Society. The Law Society of the North-West Territories started in 1898 with 186 members on the roll. The Law Society of Saskatchewan continued to use this roll until 1911 when a new parchment roll book was procured. The first name entered in the parchment roll is Amédée Emmanuel Forget, the last Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories and the first Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Saskatchewan. The benchers hoped that every barrister and solicitor in the province would come to sign the roll. It remained open for one year after which the secretary was instructed to “cause the names of any members who have not signed to be engrossed on the roll in distinctive characters not liable to be mistaken for autograph signatures.” As a result, some early names appear in pencil in the roll. In December 1912, the benchers passed a resolution to create a rule making it a requirement of admission to actually sign the roll.

Signing Roll – Rule amended

Moved by Mr. Acheson seconded by Mr. Black that no one be admitted as barrister and solicitor until he actually signs the roll; and that the declaration of nonpractise required by the Rules be taken at the time of signing the roll and that the rules be amended accordingly. Carried Unanimously.

Law Society Benchers Meeting Minutes, December 1912
Law Society Benchers Meeting Minutes, December 1912

The same 1911 roll is still in use today. It has space for 13,000 signatures. Students can sign the roll in ballpoint pen or a dip pen and ink.

Signing the Law Society Roll Book (Throwback Thursday)

Posted on

rollspine
Roll Book Spine with Embossed Title
rollsignatures1906
Signatures in the Roll Book, June-July 1906

It is that time of the year again! The students who have completed the Bar Admissions Program will be eligible for admission as lawyers. Those admitted will be required to sign the roll at the Law Society. The Law Society of the North-West Territories started in 1898 with 186 members on the roll. The Law Society of Saskatchewan continued to use this roll until 1911 when a new parchment roll book was procured. The first name entered in the parchment roll is Amédée Emmanuel Forget, the last Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories and the first Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Saskatchewan. The benchers hoped that every barrister and solicitor in the province would come to sign the roll. It remained open for one year after which the secretary was instructed to “cause the names of any members who have not signed to be engrossed on the roll in distinctive characters not liable to be mistaken for autograph signatures.” As a result, some early names appear in pencil in the roll. In December 1912, the benchers passed a resolution to create a rule making it a requirement of admission to actually sign the roll.

Signing Roll – Rule amended

Moved by Mr. Acheson seconded by Mr. Black that no one be admitted as barrister and solicitor until he actually signs the roll; and that the declaration of nonpractise required by the Rules be taken at the time of signing the roll and that the rules be amended accordingly. Carried Unanimously.

The same 1911 roll is still in use today. It has space for 13,000 signatures. Students can sign the roll in ballpoint pen or a dip pen and ink.

First Female Student-At-Law (Throwback Thursday)

Posted on Updated on

There was no female member of the Law Society of Saskatchewan when it came into existence in 1907. Margaret I. Burgess’s application for admission as a student-at-law in 1912 was refused as there was no provision in The Legal Profession Act for admission of females.

7 Mar 1912 – Student refused – Miss Burgess

Moved by Mr. Patrick seconded by Mr. MacKenzie that in the opinion of the Benchers the Legal Profession Act makes no provision for admission of females and that the application of Miss Margaret I. Burgess be therefore refused; and that the fee deposited be returned to her.  Carried.

burgessHowever, the deputy attorney general was informed that if an amendment to The Legal Profession Act authorizing the admission of women were proposed, it would meet with no opposition from the Law Society. On January 11, 1913, an amendment to the Act was passed allowing for admission of female students. Burgess was admitted as a student-at-law in June 1913. The Regina Morning Leader reported the following on November 29, 1924:

Intrepid Girl Lawyer Making Pioneer Move – Margaret I. Burgess Is First Woman Lawyer In Province To Open Office For Self

Though her knees were shaking and she had no idea how she got through it Miss Margaret I. Burgess, Saskatchewan’s first woman lawyer, won the first case she pleaded in court. This was in Weyburn, where she has been practising with M. A. Miller since 1918, so she told The Leader yesterday. Now she has come to Regina to open a law office of her own in the Westman Chambers, the first woman lawyer in Saskatchewan to take such an adventurous step. Several other women lawyers are practising in the province, but no other one has had the temerity to open an office of her own. [*]

In May 1935, Burgess was appointed Juvenile Court Judge.

 

* According to the Law Society’s record, Mary Cathcart was the first woman admitted to the Law Society of Saskatchewan. Cathcart was admitted on April 18, 1917, practised with Chisholm & Company and left Saskatchewan after one year.

Signing the Law Society Roll Book (Throwback Thursday)

Posted on Updated on

DiefenbakerRollsm
John Diefenbaker’s signature in the Law Society Roll Book, signed June 30, 1919
rollspine
Roll Book Spine with Embossed Title

It is that time of the year again! The students who have completed the Bar Admissions Program will be eligible for admission as lawyers. Those admitted will be required to sign the roll at the Law Society. The Law Society of the North-West Territories started in 1898 with 186 members on the roll. The Law Society of Saskatchewan continued to use this roll until 1911 when a new parchment roll book was procured. The first name entered in the parchment roll is Amédée Emmanuel Forget, the last Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories and the first Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Saskatchewan. The benchers hoped that every barrister and solicitor in the province would come to sign the roll. It remained open for one year after which the secretary was instructed to “cause the names of any members who have not signed to be engrossed on the roll in distinctive characters not liable to be mistaken for autograph signatures.” As a result, some early names appear in pencil in the roll. In December 1912, the benchers passed a resolution to create a rule making it a requirement of admission to actually sign the roll.

Signing Roll – Rule amended

Moved by Mr. Acheson seconded by Mr. Black that no one be admitted as barrister and solicitor until he actually signs the roll; and that the declaration of nonpractise required by the Rules be taken at the time of signing the roll and that the rules be amended accordingly. Carried Unanimously.

Law Society Benchers Meeting Minutes, December 1912
Law Society Benchers Meeting Minutes, December 1912

The same 1911 roll is still in use today. It has space for 13,000 signatures. Students can sign the roll in ballpoint pen or a dip pen and ink.