Signing the Law Society Roll Book

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DiefenbakerRollsm
John Diefenbaker’s signature in the Law Society Roll Book, signed June 30, 1919
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Roll Book Spine with Embossed Title

It is that time of the year again! The students who have completed the Bar Admissions Program will be eligible for admission as lawyers. Those admitted will be required to sign the roll at the Law Society. The Law Society of the North-West Territories started in 1898 with 186 members on the roll. The Law Society of Saskatchewan continued to use this roll until 1911 when a new parchment roll book was procured. The first name entered in the parchment roll is Amédée Emmanuel Forget, the last Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories and the first Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Saskatchewan. The benchers hoped that every barrister and solicitor in the province would come to sign the roll. It remained open for one year after which the secretary was instructed to “cause the names of any members who have not signed to be engrossed on the roll in distinctive characters not liable to be mistaken for autograph signatures.” As a result, some early names appear in pencil in the roll. In December 1912, the benchers passed a resolution to create a rule making it a requirement of admission to actually sign the roll.

Signing Roll – Rule amended

Moved by Mr. Acheson seconded by Mr. Black that no one be admitted as barrister and solicitor until he actually signs the roll; and that the declaration of nonpractise required by the Rules be taken at the time of signing the roll and that the rules be amended accordingly. Carried Unanimously.

Law Society Benchers Meeting Minutes, December 1912
Law Society Benchers Meeting Minutes, December 1912

The same 1911 roll is still in use today. It has space for 13,000 signatures. Students can sign the roll in ballpoint pen or a dip pen and ink.

Subject Resource Guide – Tort Law (Tip of the Week)

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By Alan Kilpatrick

The Tort Law Subject Resource Guide is now available online at the at Research Resources  area of the Law Society website.

Subject resource guides provide the titles of key texts, ebooks, CPD materials, journals, legal encyclopedias, and provincial and federal legislation for a particular area of the law.  They are guides to finding the best resources for an area of the law.  The guides are intended to be used by those starting new legal research projects and to ensure that obvious resources are not missed.

Other subject guides available at Research Resources include:

 

The Law Society Library will continue to develop subject resource lists in every area of legal practice on a regular basis.

 

Tell Me What You Want to Do

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  • I know it can be done in Word (or Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote). I’ve done it before but I don’t remember how or where it is on the menu.
  • I know it is there, but I don’t have time to look. I need to get this done now.
  • The instructions say look for Picture Tools, look for format tab, and click…. Where is everything? Seriously…

If you have ever been in any of the above situations, read on. There is a great feature for you in Office 2016. “Tell me what you want to do” (also known as Tell Me Assistant) is a handy tool available in Microsoft Office 2016.

Context-sensitive help has been around for a very long time and most people are familiar with it. Tell Me Assistant takes it one step further. Simply type what you want to do in the Tell Me Assistant box. Instead of getting instructions on how to do something, Tell Me Assistant shows you the menu required to get the job done. As you type into the Tell Me box, Tell Me Assistant will provide a list of suggestions. Click on the one you need and you get the menu immediately. If the task requires further selection of options, they will be provided on a flyout menu. No more looking for menu items on the ribbon or following lengthy instructions.

Expert users of Office who know their keyboard shortcuts by heart may find the Tell Me Assistant redundant if not downright irritating like Clippy the Office Assistant (Office 97 to 2003). Admittedly typing Alt-Ctrl-c to insert a copyright symbol is a lot faster, if you remember the shortcuts. But for the rest of us, Tell Me Assistant is a time saver. And let’s not forget those times when you are on the road with a mobile device and no external keyboard.

Below are a few examples:

Insert £, €, ©, ®, and other symbols (Word)

Put your mouse where you want the symbol to appear. Type symbol into the Tell Me Assistant box. Pick the symbol you need and voilà, it’s done. By the way, I used Tell Me Assistant to insert the à in voilà.

Text Box (Word)

Highlight the text to be put in a text box, type text box in the Tell Me Assistant box.

Click and drag the handles to resize the text box and click on the Layout Option icon on the top right corner for text wrapping options.

Page Number (Word)

Type page number into the Tell Me Assistant box, choose the position and format of page number on the flyout menu.

Pivot Table (Excel)

Here’s my all-time favourite. Highlight table cells, type pivot table in the Tell Me Assistant box.

 

and here you are with a pivoted table:

Here are a few more of my favourites. Give it a try.

  • Footnote
  • Table of contents
  • Change case
  • Link
  • Bookmark
  • Cross-reference
  • Margin

Parenting After Separation and Divorce Program – May 2017

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Family Justice Services is offering Parenting After Separation and Divorce Program at these locations in May 2017:

Estevan – Saturday, May 13, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Regina – Saturday, May 13 and May 27, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Swift Current – Saturday, May 27, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Yorkton – Saturday, May 13, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

These public information sessions are intended to help people who are considering or may be in the separation/divorce process. Topics of discussion include:

  • Options for resolving disputes and stages of separation and divorce: Presentation of the various stages, losses and changes experienced by separating or divorcing couples. Discussion of the options available for dispute resolution. Information of Child Support Guidelines.
  • Children’s reaction to separation/divorce: Discussion of how children may react at different developmental ages. Video presentation in which children talk about their personal experience of separation and/or divorce.
  • Challenges to parenting post separation/divorce: Presentation on changing family structure and roles. Emphasis on communication and keeping children out of the middle of parental conflict. Discussion video.

There is no fee for these sessions but registration is mandatory. To register, call (306) 787-9905 in Regina or toll-free 1-888-218-2822. Location will be provided when you register. Classes are for adults only. No child care will be provided.

 

New Journals Issues – March 2017

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By Sarah Roussel-Lewis

The Advocates’ Quarterly
Volume 46, Number 4 (March 2017)

  • Recognition of Aboriginal Self-Government in Canada: The Changing Landscapes / Diana Ginn and Nicholas Hooper
  • The Paradoxical Presumption of Constitutionality / Asher Honickman
  • What Your Client Doesn’t Know Can Hurt You: Structured Settlement Essentials for Litigators / Brittany Gillingham
  • Standardizing the Assessment of Testamentary Capacity / Kimberly A. Whatley, Megan Brenkel, Kenneth I. Shulman and Keri L. Crawford
  • Standing in the Way: Comparing Constraints on Access to Justice After the Liberalization of Public Interest Standing in Canada and Israel / Matt Malone
  • Fontaine v. Canada (Attorney General): Privacy and Confidential Settlement with Government / Emily Lieffers
  • Punitive Damages in Morison v. Ergo-Industrial Seating: The New “Wallace Bump”? / Paul J. Willetts

 

Canadian Business Law Journal
Volume 59, Number 1 (March 2017)

  • The Statutory Claim for Secondary Market Misrepresentations after Theratechnologies and Green / David M. Feldman
  • Pension Deemed Trust: What’s Left? / Alain Prévost
  • Beyond Access to Justice: Litigation Funding Agreements Outside the Class Actions Context / Ranjan K. Agarwal and Doug Fenton
  • Policy Trumps the Constitution: Chevron v. Yaiguaje / Elizabeth Edinger
  • Stephanie Ben-Ishai, Book Review of How the Other Half Banks: Exclusion, Exploitation and the Threat to Democracy by Mehrsa Baradaran (2017) 59:1 CBLJ 119
  • Jonnette Watson Hamilton, Book Review of Landmark Cases in Property Law by Simon Douglas (2017) 59:1 CBLJ 133

Happy (Belated) Birthday CanLII Connects!

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By Melanie Hodges Neufeld

The CanLII Blog recently posted a message celebrating the third birthday of CanLII Connects. As we have posted before, CanLII Connects is a phenomenal website that features high-quality legal commentary and summaries of Canadian court decisions.  It’s a continually growing source of authoritative legal commentary that is free, accessible, and open to anyone.  Currently, the site boasts summaries of over 37,000 Canadian decisions dating back to the 1800s.

The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library has been a major supporter of CanLII Connects since it was launched in April 2014.  To date, the Law Society Library has submitted over 25,000 summaries of Saskatchewan court decisions to CanLII Connects.  This represents our entire collection of case digests.  As you may know, the Law Society Library employs a number of contract digesters to summarize and digest Saskatchewan court decisions.  These digests appear in Case Mail, our popular semi-monthly newsletter, and in the Saskatchewan Cases database.

Please see the CanLII Blog for useful tips for using the CanLII Connects site.