Saskatchewan Proclamations

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The Agricultural Implements Amendment Act, SS 2018, c 1, has been proclaimed into force November 9, 2018.

The Reclaimed Industrial Sites Amendment Act, 2018, SS 2018, c 32, has been proclaimed into force December 1, 2018.

Academic Authors Sharing their Writing on CanLII

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By Sarah Sutherland; reposted with permission from the CanLii Blog

CanLIIDocs was created as a platform to share legal commentary, and we now have many types of resources available on CanLIIDocs written by authors from various backgrounds. Here is a page where you can browse what’s currently available on the site.

One group that has been enthusiastic in endorsing CanLII as a vehicle to share their work is legal scholars. In this post we would like to highlight some of the academics who agreed to share their work with legal researchers on CanLII:

François Crépeau is full professor and the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law, at the Faculty of Law of McGill University, as well as the director of the McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. You can read publications by François Crépeau on CanLII here.

Paul Daly is a University Senior Lecturer in Public Law at the University of Cambridge and the Derek Bowett Fellow in Law at Queens’ College, Cambridge. Before working at Cambridge he was at the University of Montreal. You can follow his commentary on developments in administrative law on his blog: Administrative Law Matters. CanLII contains multiple publications by Paul Daly which you can read here.

Armand Claude de Mestral is professor emeritus and Jean Monnet Chair in the Law of International Economic Integration at McGill University. Some of his publications on CanLII include Dispute Settlement Under the WTO and RTAs: An Uneasy Relationship and Investor-State Arbitration between Developed Democratic CountriesYou can read more publications by Armand Claude de Mestral on CanLII here.

Gerry Ferguson is a University of Victoria Distinguished Professor of Law who specializes in criminal law. He is also a senior associate with the International Centre for Criminal Law Reform and Criminal Justice Policy in Vancouver. You can read his recent law textbook publication titled Global Corruption: Law, Theory & Practice on CanLII.

Michael Geist is a law professor at the University of Ottawa where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law, and a former CanLII Board member. You can learn more about Michael Geist and follow his commentary on developments in information and privacy, intellectual property, and internet law from his eponymous blog. You can read several works by Michael Geist on CanLII here.

Linda C. Neilson is professor emerita at the University of New Brunswick, a lawyer, and a socio-legal academic. Her fields include domestic violence, court systems, conflict resolution, family law and sociology of law. One of her recent works includes a comprehensive ebook on domestic violence and family law published on CanLII. You can find Responding to Domestic Violence in Family Law, Civil Protection & Child Protection Cases on CanLII here.

Eric M. Tucker has been a professor at Osgoode Hall Law for over 35 years. He has published extensively in the fields of occupational health and safety regulation and labour law. Some of his publications on CanLII include On Writing Labour Law History: A Reconnaissance, and When Wage Theft Was a Crime in Canada, 1935-1955. You can read more publications by Eric M. Tucker on CanLII here.

Please join us in thanking them for seeing the value in open legal commentary!

If you would like to see your work in CanLIIDocs too, here’s how.

Here is what CanLII provides:

  • A reliable and credible online platform for authors to publish their content
  • A permalink with CanLII in the URL
  • Licensing options that allow you to continue sharing your work while keeping control of your rights

Free Legal Resources Fair at the Saskatoon Public Library

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Law Society of Saskatchewan librarians Ken Fox and Alan Kilpatrick, (used with permission from Theressa Slind, community librarian at Saskatoon Public Library,

By Alan Kilpatrick 

The Saskatoon Public Library’s Frances Morrison branch hosted a free Legal Resources Fair during Saskatchewan’s Third Access to Justice Week.  The fair featured a tradeshow, legal assistance clinics, and presentations on legal topics.

The fair’s bustling trade show included representatives from non-profit, government, and community organizations.  It gave members of the public a chance to connect with Saskatoon’s legal service providers.

Volunteer lawyers and law students from the Ministry of Justice, Pro Bono Law Saskatchewan, and Pro Bono Students Canada hosted a free walk-in family law information clinic.  Lawyers from CJC & Co. LLP volunteered to host a free walk-in wills and estates information clinic

Law Society Librarian’s Ken Fox and Alan Kilpatrick were proud to attend the trade show and to connect with members of the public who had questions about legal information.

Hosting a fair like this aligns naturally with the mission of public libraries.  CREATE Justice explains further on its website:

Saskatoon Public Library’s mission includes providing free and open access to resources as well as providing community spaces where people and ideas meet. Through the Legal Resource Fair, we are able to help meet the legal needs of Saskatoon citizens with the tradeshow of service providers, a walk-in family law information clinic, and a walk-in wills & estates information clinic.

The Law Society Library is looking forward to participating in the Regina Public Library’s annual Legal Resources Fair in Winter 2019.

 

Sources

Create Justice. (2018, October). Saskatchewan access to justice week. Retrieved from https://law.usask.ca/createjustice/saskatchewan-access-to-justice-week.php

Legal Sourcery. (2018, October 24). Free Legal Resources Fair – Saskatoon. Retrieved from https://lsslib.wordpress.com/2018/10/24/free-legal-resources-fair-saskatoon/

Saskatchewan Legislative Update

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The following regulations were published in The Saskatchewan Gazette, Part II, Vol. 114 No. 45, November 9, 2018:

  • SR 76/2018 The Cities (Property Classification) Amendment Regulations, 2018
  • SR 77/2018 The Northern Municipalities (Property Classification) Amendment Regulations, 2018
  • SR 78/2018 The Municipalities (Property Classification) Amendment Regulations, 2018
  • SR 79/2018 The Western Livestock Price Insurance Program Amendment Regulations, 2018

Saskatchewan Introduces Claire’s Law

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By Alan Kilpatrick

Justice Minister Don Morgan introduced Bill 141: The Interpersonal Violence Disclosure Protocol (Clare’s Law) Act to the Saskatchewan Legislature on November 5th.  The legislation is intended to enable police to inform an at-risk individual about their partner’s violent past.  Saskatchewan, according to the Government’s new release, is the first province in Canada to introduce legislation of this kind.

The bill, also known as Claire’s Law after a British woman murdered by her partner, emerged out of the Government’s Domestic Violence Review Panel.  Earlier this year, the panel’s final report acknowledged that Saskatchewan has the highest rate of domestic violence in Canada.  It proposed several recommendations including Claire’s Law.

The legislation would, CBC Saskatchewan reported, enable a concerned party to make an application pursuant to the legislation.  A panel would review the application and determine whether to release information about a violent individual to their partner.

Fittingly, representatives from the Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services of Saskatchewan (PATHS) were present at the Legislature for the introduction of the legislation.  PATHS is a non-profit organization that provides domestic violence support services in Saskatchewan.

 Sources

Government of Saskatchewan. (2018, May 24). Saskatchewan Domestic Violence Death Review Report. Retrieved from http://www.saskatchewan.ca/~/media/news%20release%20backgrounders/2018/may/sk%20dv%20death%20review%20report.pdf

Graham, J. (2018, November 5). Interpersonal Violence Disclosure Protocol Act – Clare’s Law – Introduced In Saskatchewan. Retrieved from https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2018/november/05/clares-law

Hunter, A. (2018, November 5). Saskatchewan 1st to introduce Clare’s Law, aimed at stopping domestic violence. Retrieved from https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/sask-clares-law-domestic-violence-1.4892606.

Queen’s Bench Rules Annotated 2018-2019 Ready for Pick-up

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By Christine Muldoon

To all those in Regina or Saskatoon who pre-ordered the QBRA, your copies with invoices are ready to be picked up at the Law Society Library in your judicial centre. The Law Society Library thanks you!

If you have not ordered your copy yet, here is the order form.

9 x 6 paperback (1008 pages)
ISBN 978-1-7750299-3-9
$250.00 + tax (and shipping, if applicable)

Ebook (1008 pages)
ISBN 978-1-7750299-4-6
$250.00 + tax

Features of the Saskatchewan Queen’s Bench Rules Annotated 2018-2019 include:

  • Content updated to Saskatchewan Gazette Volume 114, No. 13
  • Case law updated to March 2018
  • Full index, tariff of costs, historical concordance from 1961, tables of cases, statutes and authorities
  • All annotations and updates by Christine Johnston BEd, LLB