Webinar/Training

Upcoming CPD Activities

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NEW! Sidebar Social on the Road: Ethics in Everyday Practice – Dealing With Your Client

Regina (Copper Kettle) – Wednesday September 19, 2018

This Fall we are returning to Regina with our popular Sidebar Social Series. As with previous sessions, this program will offer an opportunity to gain some practical knowledge on a relevant topic from a panel of judges and an experienced senior practitioner.

The casual setting involves a CPD presentation dedicated to an in-depth discussion of the ethical considerations encountered in everyday practice and will focus specifically on the issues at hand when dealing with clients, there will also be a generous question period and a light meal, beverages and some time for networking are also included. Don’t miss out on this unique event!

To register, please follow this link: Sidebar Social – Ethics in Everyday Practice

NB – This iteration of the Sidebar Social has previously been hosted in Saskatoon, Prince Albert and Weyburn. Registrants from those locations will not be able to claim CPD hours for attendance at this session.

 

REMINDER! – TRC Call to Action #27 Training: The Blanket Exercise

Wednesday August 8, 2018 – Regina (Ramada Plaza) | Thursday September 6, 2018 – Saskatoon (TCU Place)

The Law Society is partnering with Regina and Saskatoon Public Schools Indigenous Education Facilitators to offer our members a truly interactive learning experience that furthers our efforts to address the TRC Calls to Action.

The Blanket Exercise was developed in response to the 1996 Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, which suggests, “education is a key to reconciliation, understanding and knowing our collective histories between non-Aboriginal Canadians and Indigenous peoples.” The RCAP Report further states, “we can begin reconciliation with a better sense of history once we know one another as citizens.” This workshop offers attendees the opportunity to take part in a simulation, covering over 500 years of history in a participatory and interactive format.

Qualifies for 3 CPD Hours, all of which qualify as Ethics.

For more information and to register click here: The Blanket Exercise

TRC-Related CPD Activities Bundle

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By Sarah Rider
Continuing Professional Development, Law Society of Saskatchewan 

For the remainder of the month of June, in recognition of National Indigenous History Month and in celebration of National Indigenous Peoples Day on June 21st, the CPD department of the Law Society is offering all TRC CPD programs to date at a special rate!

The below listed recorded sessions can be purchased as a bundle for $300 (+5% GST = $315), this is a savings of $95!

To take advantage of this special offer, please send Visa or MasterCard payment details to cpd@lawsociety.sk.ca or send a cheque to 1100-2002 Victoria Ave., Regina, S4P 0R7.

The Black Box of Deep Learning

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By Ken Fox

At the 2018 CALL/ACBD Conference in Halifax, Michael Ridley of the University of Guelph delivered a fascinating discussion on The Right to Explanation: Artificial Intelligence, Information Policy, and the Black Box of Deep Learning. His talk filled my head with questions and my notebook pages with confused scratching purporting to be notes. What follows is my best excuse for a coherent account based on said scratchings.

The popular conception of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has had many meanings. What they have in common is this: AI is what we haven’t done yet – it’s always the next thing. But the technology itself, for the most part, belongs to the classical age of programming. The features in popular software that anticipate your consumer behaviour are based on relatively simple linear regressions, old-school statistical logic.

As such, AI already permeates our online life. It is a pervasive ghost in the filters of our search engines.

There is a new movement toward autonomous AI, which has the attribute of agency. Given sufficient background information, the system can make decisions without a programmer’s assistance.

Designers endowed their system with the rules of Go, humanity’s most complex game. For forty days and forty nights the system played the game non-stop against itself, learning strategy thru iteration. Upon completing its rigorous trial, AlphaGo Zero played the world Go champion and soundly defeated him. The human master was shaken by the experience, reflecting that the computer played the game like no other player, frequently making illogical and outrageous moves. Was the tactic to confound strategy? To unsettle the opponent? Does the system have emotional intelligence? These questions remain unanswered. The best of human players are now mimicking the machine’s tactics.

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is now in effect, and one of its key features is the right to an explanation. The regulation purports to legislate the idea that if an algorithm makes a decision about you, you have the right to know why, to look at the process of how the decision was made. Although the law is only effective in Europe, its impact is global, due to the Brussels effect.

But the right to an explanation, although law, is confronted by the black box problem. AI is opaque. Data goes in. Unsupervised learning occurs. Processed data come out.

Input, black box, output.

Deep learning has no explanatory power.

For example, there is no explanation for why AI perpetuates poverty and discrimination in insurance, advertising, education, and policing. This tale is told in Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy by Cathy O’Neil and Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism by Safiya Umoja Noble.

Explainable AI (XAI) is a name for all attempts to see inside the black box.

Sometimes XAI manifests in proofs: cause and effect, classic logic, mechanisms, mathematics. Oftentimes XAI employs validations, goes under the hood and picks apart the algorithm, removing bits of code and recording system response. Other times, XAI takes the form of authorizations: codes, standards, expertise, audits, legislation, regulation, due process.

XAI is often only achieved by limiting a system’s complexity. The X is purchased at the expense of the I.

What happens to libraries and librarians when machines can read all the books? asks Chris Bourg in Feral Librarian. Are machines and algorithms to become a new class of client?

How do we make the law into machine-relatable data?

Today’s AI issues can be related to libraries by analogy. Overfitting, when analysis too-closely follows the particularities of data at the expense of its power to be applied generally, can be related to the propensity to rely on Google or Wikipedia, where results are obtained too quickly and cheaply. Dimensionality, the problem of an overabundance of variables in need of reduction, relates to information overload (Note: to me this seems to be the same problem – too much data – in a different context, rather than an analogy). Hand Engineering, the process of manually tweaking the data to improve results, can be compared to metadata, the conceptualization of information.

XAI by AI: the solution to XAI is more AI.

The new digital divide is between those using algorithms and those used by algorithms.

Technology Academy for Saskatchewan Lawyers and Legal Professionals

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By Sarah Rider
Continuing Professional Development, Law Society of Saskatchewan

Technology Academy for Saskatchewan Lawyers and Legal Professionals 2018 with Barron K. Henley is fast approaching! Don’t miss out on this opportunity to attend a seminar with one of the most popular CPD instructors in North America and an expert on technology solutions for lawyers.

Barron presented to Saskatchewan members of the bar in 2012, 2016 and is back on May 30th in Regina and 31st in Saskatoon. Barron’s classes are designed by lawyers for legal professionals making them some of the most relevant training you and your staff can receive in the legal technology area.

In his 2018 program Barron will take us back to basics in hopes of allowing members and their staff to fully utilize the software they work with (and pay for!) every day, with sessions titled:

  • Microsoft Word Power Tips
  • Using Outlook To Get Email Under Control
  • A Lawyer’s Guide to PDF Files

He will then switch gears to discuss that ever present concern when considering technology for lawyers; security. His session Cyber Security – Legal Tech Security Measures Every Lawyer Should Take will provide practical measures members and their staff can take to manage their high-risk digital environments. Barron will complete this seminar with a session entitled, 8 Things Hurting Your Law Firm – And How to Eliminate Them.

Don’t miss out on this opportunity. Register here.

 

Upcoming CPD Opportunities

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NEW! TRC Call to Action #27 Training: The Blanket Exercise

Wednesday, August 8, 2018 – Regina (Ramada Plaza)

The Law Society is partnering with Regina Public Schools Indigenous Education Facilitators to offer our members a truly interactive learning experience that furthers our efforts to address the TRC Calls to Action.

The Blanket Exercise was developed in response to the 1996 Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, which suggests, “education is a key to reconciliation, understanding and knowing our collective histories between non-Aboriginal Canadians and Indigenous peoples.” The RCAP Report further states, “we can begin reconciliation with a better sense of history once we know one another as citizens.” This workshop offers attendees the opportunity to take part in a simulation, covering over 500 years of history in a participatory and interactive format.

Qualifies for 3 CPD Hours, all of which qualify as Ethics.

For more information and to register: The Blanket Exercise

FAST APPROACHINGLegal Technology Academy for Saskatchewan Lawyers and Legal Professionals 2018 Featuring Barron K. Henley (CPD-200)

Wednesday, May 30, 2018 – Regina (Ramada Plaza)
Thursday, May 31, 2018 – Saskatoon (Radisson Hotel)

Back by popular demand, Barron K. Henley is returning to Saskatchewan with his unique brand of legal technology training!

This full day of programming is a must for lawyers and legal staff alike as it aims to aid in the utilisation of programs you likely already have and are paying for. With sessions dedicated to getting the most out of Word and Outlook, and a guide to PDF Files you will leave this seminar with immediate and actionable time and cost saving strategies. The final two sessions will discuss Cyber Security and Barron’s top 8 Things Hurting Your Law Firm – And How to Eliminate Them.

Qualifies for 6 CPD Hours, 2 of which qualify as Ethics.

For more information and to register: Legal Tech Academy

REMINDERSelect Dinner: Touchstones for Change, The Justicia Project, #MeToo: Reflections, Reality-Checks and Aspirations on the “Status of Women in the Legal Profession” in 2018

Tuesday, June 5, 2018 (Saskatoon)
Thursday, June 7, 2018 (Regina)

Following up on her “President’s Musing” in the Fall 2017 Edition of the Bencher’s Digest: Women in the Law – Moving in the Right Direction, Erin Kleisinger, Q.C. will reflect on the in-roads that have been made for women in the law over the past 25 years, the places where barriers (real and perceived) still exist, and what senior practitioners, as leaders in the profession, can do to ensure that women continue to gain meaningful influence and inclusion in the legal profession.

Qualifies for 1 CPD Hour, which also qualifies for Ethics.

Additional information and registration details can be found here: Select Dinner

LAST CHANCE Free Webinar: Integration of Internationally Trained Lawyers (CPD-203)

Thursday May 24, 2018 – 12 to 1 pm (Sask Time)

Presenters: Lola Ayotunde; Wura Dasylva; Deborah Wolfe, P.Eng.;

This free webinar is being offered in response to an article written by Lola Ayotunde for the most recent edition of the Bencher’s Digest. Lola eloquently and ably outlines some of the hurdles faced by Internationally Trained Lawyers (ITLs) as they go about the process of integrating into the profession in their new home country. To help our members understand the unique challenges ITLs face when attempting to join the Saskatchewan Bar, the Law Society has put together a panel of ideally placed speakers to discuss this issue.

We are pleased to welcome Deborah Wolfe, P.Eng. Executive Director, National Committee on Accreditation and Law School Programs from the Federation of Law Societies of Canada to introduce and explain the NCA process and the timelines associated with the process. Joining Deborah will be Lola and her colleague Wura Dasylva. Wura and Lola are both ITLs who have successfully navigated the Canadian, and Saskatchewan, system through the NCA process, accessing articling positions, and participating in the CPLED program.

Qualifies for 1 CPD Hour, which also qualifies for Ethics.

To register: Integration of Internationally Trained Lawyers

Truth and Reconciliation Information on the Law Society Website

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By Sarah Rider
CPD Program Coordinator, Law Society of Saskatchewan

Did you know the Law Society has an entire page dedicated to our ongoing efforts to respond to the TRC Calls to Action? Well you do now!

Truth and Reconciliation | Law Society of Saskatchewan

Call to Action # 27 states: We call upon the Federation of Law Societies of Canada to ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal – Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

This page has been recently updated and hosts a variety of resources, both of our own creation and a collection of additional links and information which have been gathered together to offer lawyers a starting point from which to begin the process of becoming better educated on these topics and issues.

This is certainly not an exhaustive list of TRC resources and if you come across anything you think would make a great addition to the page, please contact Barbra Bailey, Policy Counsel at barbra.bailey@lawsociety.sk.ca or Kara-Dawn Jordan, Policy Counsel at kara-dawn.jordan@lawsociety.sk.ca 

The Law Society AGM, with an esteemed panel of speakers discussing the implication of the TRC for the legal profession takes place THIS THURSDAY! Please consider joining us for this unique opportunity.

REMINDER! – Annual General Meeting: The Truth and Reconciliation Commission – Implications for the Legal Profession

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By Melanie Hodges Neufeld

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission – Implications for the Legal Profession
Thursday April 26, 2018 – Saskatoon (Delta Bessborough Hotel)

In a continuation of the Law Society’s efforts to address the TRC Calls to Action, the focus of this year’s CPD Presentation at the Annual General Meeting will be the implications of the TRC recommendations for the legal profession. Our panel of Professor Larry Chartrand, Former Judge Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, and Leanne Bellegarde, Q.C. will each approach this question from their unique viewpoints.

At the conclusion of the discussion, cocktails will commence allowing time for networking with panel members, colleagues, and members of the Bar. Dinner will be served shortly thereafter, and the business matters and awards presentations will conclude the evening. The Law Society’s 2017 Annual Report and Financial Statements are available on our website. SLIA’s Financial Statements are also available.

Qualifies for 2 CPD Hours, which also qualify for Ethics.

Additional information and registration details can be found here: AGM 2018