Tip of the Week

Subject Resource Guide – Tort Law (Tip of the Week)

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By Alan Kilpatrick

The Tort Law Subject Resource Guide is now available online at the at Research Resources  area of the Law Society website.

Subject resource guides provide the titles of key texts, ebooks, CPD materials, journals, legal encyclopedias, and provincial and federal legislation for a particular area of the law.  They are guides to finding the best resources for an area of the law.  The guides are intended to be used by those starting new legal research projects and to ensure that obvious resources are not missed.

Other subject guides available at Research Resources include:

 

The Law Society Library will continue to develop subject resource lists in every area of legal practice on a regular basis.

 

Saskatchewan Legal Research Primer (Tip of the Week)

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By Alan Kilpatrick

Need a quick primer on Saskatchewan legal research?  

  1. Court Rules: Publications Saskatchewan publishes the Court of Appeal Rules and the Queen’s Bench Rules online at publications.gov.sk.ca/freelaw.  The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library publishes annotated print copies of these rules.  The Saskatchewan Queen’s Bench Rules Annotated 2016 Consolidation and Civil Appeals in Saskatchewan feature high quality commentary and practical observations on case law and legislation.  Copies are available for sale on the Law Society website.
  2. Provincial Point-In-Time Research: Point-in time consolidations and historical legislation are available online on the Publications Saskatchewan website.  The Law Society Library maintains the Saskatchewan Bills and the Saskatchewan Regulations databases.  These searchable databases track changes to Saskatchewan statutes and regulations over time, chart the progress of bills, feature proclamation dates, and include legislative summaries.  Saskatchewan Proclamations features a handy list of provincial proclamations dates from 2000 to the present.
  3. Legislative Assembly Website: The Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan website charts the progress of bills before the current session of the Legislature as well as previous sessions from 1998 to the present.  Debates and hansard are available from 1998 to the present and can be browsed by date through the legislative calendar, searched through the subject index or speaker index.  Information about committees, minutes, orders, and journals can also be found here.
  4. Legislative materials:  The premier resource for Saskatchewan legislation is the Publications Saskatchewan website, available for no charge at publications.gov.sk.ca/freelaw.  It hosts a comprehensive collection of current Saskatchewan legislation as well as a growing historical collection.  They also maintain legislative tables that are essential for historical research.  The legislation available online is considered authoritative, not official.  Only paper copies of legislation are considered official.
  5. Continuing Legal Education: The Law Society of Saskatchewan operates a mandatory continuing professional development (CPD) program for members.  Some past editions of CPD materials, Bar Course materials, and other legal education materials are available for free online through the CPD Full-Text Search, a unique resource maintained by the Law Society Library.       
  6. Law Society of Saskatchewan Library: The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library serves the legal information needs of Saskatchewan members, articling students, and the public by providing a print and online library collection, high quality legal research services, and a variety of Saskatchewan focused legal publications.
  7. Additional Resources:  The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library participated in a digitization project with CanLII.  As a result, CanLII now features a nearly complete record of Saskatchewan case law from 1907 to the present.  Those searching for Saskatchewan case law should also consider consulting Saskatchewan Cases.  This searchable database features digests of Saskatchewan cases from the late 1980’s to the present.

Please contact the Law Society of Saskatchewan Library at reference@lawsociety.ca or 306-569-8020 if you have questions regarding Saskatchewan legal research.

 

The Conflict of Laws – What are the Sources? (Tip of the Week)

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By Ken Fox

Conflict of laws, also known as private international law, is a topic concerning the rules governing what happens when two or more legal systems clash in a private dispute. Pitel & Rafferty’s text on Conflict of Laws identifies three key questions: (1) whether a court has jurisdiction, (2) what law the court will apply, and (3) whether a judgment from another jurisdiction will be enforced. Unlike public international law, conflict of laws is not the same everywhere, but is particular to each jurisdiction.

As such, some people have asked about developing a Saskatchewan-specific resource for conflict of laws. While most of the issues discussed the textbooks are internationally-based, there are some areas, such as estates law and family property law, where inter-provincial jurisdictional issues become critical. So a Saskatchewan-based resource might be a good idea – we’ll look into it!

Nationally, the most often-cited text is Castel & Walker’s Canadian Conflict of Laws. The current (6th) edition is a two-volume looseleaf published by LexisNexis, which is available at our libraries in Regina and Saskatoon. For a more concise text, try the aforementioned Pitel and Rafferty, a volume in Irwin’s Essentials of Canadian Law series, which are available to Saskatchewan lawyers online through the Members Section of our website. Also available through the Members Section, and our shelves, is the Canadian Encyclopedic Digest volume on Conflict of Laws, which is cross-referenced to related case law in the Canadian Abridgment.

Internationally, the library maintains the current edition of the classic Dicey Morris and Collins book on The Conflict of Laws, published by Sweet & Maxwell in London. At a glance, I wasn’t sure how relevant this text is to Canadian legal disputes (unless they involve the British jurisdiction specifically), but it has been cited by Canadian courts over 400 times in CanLii, including in recent decisions by the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal and Supreme Court of Canada, so apparently it still carries some authority.

If you have any questions about the above, or have any recommendations about sources we should acquire or develop, please add your comments below, or otherwise contact us.

Subject Resource Guide – Tax Law (Tip of the Week)

Posted on Updated on

By Alan Kilpatrick

The Tax Law Subject Resource Guide is now available online at the at Research Resources  area of the Law Society website.

Subject resource guides provide the titles of key texts, ebooks, CPD materials, journals, legal encyclopedias, and provincial and federal legislation for a particular area of the law.  They are guides to finding the best resources for an area of the law.  The guides are intended to be used by those starting new legal research projects and to ensure that obvious resources are not missed.

Other subject guides available at Research Resources include:

The Law Society Library will continue to develop subject resource lists in every area of legal practice on a regular basis.

Subject Resource Guide – Insurance Law (Tip of the Week)

Posted on

By Alan Kilpatrick

The Insurance Law Subject Resource Guide is now available online at the at Research Resources  area of the Law Society website.

Subject resource guides provide the titles of key texts, ebooks, CPD materials, journals, legal encyclopedias, and provincial and federal legislation for a particular area of the law.  They are guides to finding the best resources for an area of the law.  The guides are intended to be used by those starting new legal research projects and to ensure that obvious resources are not missed.

Other subject guides available at Research Resources include:

The Law Society Library will continue to develop subject resource lists in every area of legal practice on a regular basis.

 

Subject Resource Guide – Family Law (Tip of the Week)

Posted on

By Alan Kilpatrick

The Family Law Subject Resource Guide is now available online at the at Research Resources  area of the Law Society website.

Subject resource guides provide the titles of key texts, ebooks, CPD materials, journals, legal encyclopedias, and provincial and federal legislation for a particular area of the law.  They are guides to finding the best resources for an area of the law.  The guides are intended to be used by those starting new legal research projects and to ensure that obvious resources are not missed.

Other subject guides available at Research Resources include:

The Law Society Library will continue to develop subject resource lists in every area of legal practice on a regular basis.

Subject Resource Guide – Employment and Labour Law (Tip of the Week)

Posted on

By Alan Kilpatrick

The Employment and Labour Law Subject Resource Guide is now available online at the at Research Resources  area of the Law Society website.

Subject resource guides provide the titles of key texts, ebooks, CPD materials, journals, legal encyclopedias, and provincial and federal legislation for a particular area of the law.  They are guides to finding the best resources for an area of the law.  The guides are intended to be used by those starting new legal research projects and to ensure that obvious resources are not missed.

Other subject guides available at Research Resources include:

The Law Society Library will continue to develop subject resource lists in every area of legal practice on a regular basis.