Statutes, Bills, Regulations

Changes to The Victims of Interpersonal Violence Act and The Residential Tenancies Act

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By Melanie Hodges Neufeld

On April 10th, the Government introduced and passed legislation to support individuals fleeing interpersonal violence and families of victims of crime.

The Victims of Interpersonal Violence Act and The Residential Tenancies Act, 2006 will be amended to allow a tenant to end a fixed-term rental agreement with 28 days’ notice if they or their family members are being abused by another resident or former resident. The amendments bring Saskatchewan in line with some other Canadian jurisdictions, including Alberta who passed similar legislation last year.

The ministry is also amending The Victims of Crime Act, 1995 to expand compensation for counselling costs to include parents, siblings, and adult children of adult victims who have died as a result of violent crime.The legislation previously limited compensation for counselling to the spouse or children of an adult victim and the parent or sibling of a child victim.

For more information, please see the Government of Saskatchewan news page.

Saskatchewan Legislative Update

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The following regulations were published in The Saskatchewan Gazette, Part II, Vol. 112 No. 46, November 18, 2016:

  • SR 87/2016 The Securities Commission (Adoption of National Instruments, MI 96-101) Amendment Regulations, 2016

The following regulations were published in The Saskatchewan Gazette, Part II, Vol. 112 No. 44, November 4, 2016:

  • C‑50.2 Reg 31 The Oil and Gas Tenure Registry Regulations
  • SR 82/2016 The Provincial Sales Tax (Precious Metals) Amendment Regulations, 2016
  • SR 83/2016 The Municipal Hail Insurance Amendment Regulations, 2016
  • SR 84/2016 The Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Payment (Physician Services) Amendment Regulations, 2016
  • SR 85/2016 The Legal Aid Amendment Regulations, 2016
  • SR 86/2016 The Wildlife Habitat and Ecological Lands Designation Amendment Regulations, 2016 (No. 7)

Digitized Provincial Statutes of Canada (Tip of the Week)

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By Alan Kilpatrick

Tired of dusting off old print copies of statutes when conducting historical legislation research?  HeinOnline recently announced that provincial statutes, for all ten provinces in Canada, have been digitized and are available online.  Members of the Law Society can take advantage of this exciting development by accessing HeinOnline through the Library’s subscription in the Members’ Section of the website.

Coverage varies from province to province.  Current, revised, and historical statutes are available for Alberta, British Columbia, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Ontario. Historical and revised statutes are available for Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, and Saskatchewan.

Specifically, HeinOnline features complete coverage of all Saskatchewan statutes from 1906 to 1965.  More current Saskatchewan legislation can be accessed by visiting the Queen’s Printer of Saskatchewan or the Law Society Library.

Once you open HeinOnline, click on the large HeinOnline icon on the top left of the screen.  Select Canada.  Then, Provincial Statutes of Canada:

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Select Saskatchewan from the map displayed:

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Statutes are displayed on the left while a linked table of contents is displayed on the right:

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Statutes can be easily downloaded, printed, copied and pasted, or searched by keyword.  The interface is smooth and straightforward to use.  I encourage you to check it out.

If you have any questions, ask a Law Society Librarian! We are pleased to provide high-quality legal research services to Saskatchewan members in person, on the telephone, or by email.

 

 

AskLibnEmail reference@lawsociety.sk.ca
Call 306-569-8020 in Regina
Toll-free 1-877-989-4999
Fax 306-569-0155

Municipal Conflict of Interest Act

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By Ken Fox

The remaining provisions of the Municipal Conflict of Interest Amendment Act, 2015, SS 2015, c. 30, are now in effect. Sections 2-5, 2-6, 3-5, 3-6, 4-5 and 4-6 are proclaimed into force October 26, 2016. The new provisions require municipal councils to adopt a model code of ethics and all council members are to take a prescribed oath or affirmation. For more information on the amendment, please view the government new release.

 

Saskatchewan Legislative Update

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The 1st Session of the 28th Legislature has now adjourned until October 19, 2016. The following is a list of some of the bills receiving Royal Assent:

Bill 22, The Income Tax Amendment Act, 2016 (Explanatory Notes)

Coming into force:
(1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), this Act comes into force on assent (June 30, 2016) but is retroactive and is deemed to have been in force on and from January 1, 2016.
(2) Sections 9 and 10 come into force on assent (June 30, 2016) but are retroactive and are deemed to have been in force on and from January 1, 2015.
(3) Section 11 comes into force on assent (June 30, 2016) but is retroactive and is deemed to have been in force on and from March 19, 2015.

Bill 23, The Liquor Retail Modernization Act (Explanatory Notes)

Coming into force:
This Act comes into force on proclamation

Bill 25, The Wakamow Valley Authority Amendment Act, 2016 (Explanatory Notes)

Coming into force:
This Act comes into force on assent (June 30, 2016), but is retroactive and is deemed to have been in force on and from April 1, 2016.

Bill 27, The Vital Statistics Amendment Act, 2016 (Explanatory Notes)

Coming into force:
This Act comes into force on assent (June 30, 2016)

 

Amendments to The Automobile Accident Insurance Act

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By Melanie Hodges Neufeld

On June 14th, the Minster responsible for Saskatchewan Government Insurance Don McMorris introduced amendments to The Automobile Accident Insurance Act in the Legislative Assembly. The legislation is anticipated to be passed during the fall 2016 sitting of the Legislature and the changes will take effect January 1, 2017. Changes include:

  • When an impaired driver causes a collision and is killed, allow an innocent party or the family impacted to sue for pain and suffering or bereavement damages (No Fault, Reduced No Fault and Tort coverage).
  • The list of offences that trigger the ability for an innocent party to sue for pain and suffering or bereavement damages will expand to include: criminal negligence causing death or bodily harm, criminal negligence causing bodily injury, flight from a peace officer and dangerous operation while street racing (No Fault, Reduced No Fault and Tort coverage).
  • Ensuring income benefits maintain pace with minimum wage (Tort and Reduced No Fault coverage).

For more information, please see the Government of Saskatchewan news page.