Month: June 2019

Law Society of Saskatchewan Order and Notice of Suspension: George Combe

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An Order has been released by the Hearing Committee in relation to the matter of Law Society of Saskatchewan v George Combe. The following allegations against the Member were proven:

1. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, personally harass L.S., an administrative assistant at his place of work;

2. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with L.S., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

3. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with K.Z., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

4. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with J.K., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

5. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with C.H., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

6. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with C.B., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

7. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with M.R., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

8. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with L.R., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

9. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with L. W., his co-worker, in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer;

10. did, in the course of his professional practice at the Saskatoon City Criminal Law Office of the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission, behave toward and/or communicate with certain clients in a manner that was abusive, offensive or otherwise inconsistent with the proper tone of a professional communication from a lawyer.

Further, the Hearing Committee issued a Notice of Suspension, effective July 1, 2019 in relation to Mr. Combe. Written decisions will follow.

Law Society former member receives Saskatchewan Order of Merit

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The Law Society of Saskatchewan would like to congratulate former member Dr. William F. Ready, Q.C., one of the recipients of the Saskatchewan Order of Merit 2019.

Established in 1985, the Saskatchewan Order of Merit is a prestigious recognition of excellence, achievement and contributions to the social, cultural and economic well being of the province and its residents. The Order recognizes individuals who have made their mark in such areas as the arts, agriculture, business and industry, community leadership, the occupations or progressions, public service, research, and volunteer service. It takes precedence over all other provincial honours and awards.

As per the Government of Saskatchewan’s website:

 

Dr. William F. Ready practiced law in Regina for nearly 50 years. He has been a Queen’s Counsel since 1967 and in 1990, was the recipient of the Distinguished Service Award by the Canadian Bar Association, Saskatchewan Branch.

He has been active in a number of organizations in the community, including serving as president of the Regina Symphony Orchestra and as chair of the Regina Citizens’ Advisory of the Salvation Army. As a member of the Regina Board of Education for 11 years, he participated in the introduction of many innovative programs, benefiting students and their parents. In recognition of his contributions to education in Regina, W.F. Ready School was named in his honour in 1984.

As Chancellor of the University of Regina, Dr. Ready presided over convocation ceremonies, chaired Senate meetings and served as a member of the Board of Governors. In his two terms as Chancellor, he conferred more than 13,500 degrees, diplomas and certificates. He has championed several building initiatives at the university, including the new residences and the revitalization of the College Avenue Campus.

Dr. Ready’s commitment to service, to education and to Saskatchewan are significant. He is a humble and unassuming leader, a role model and mentor to many and, above all, is described by his colleagues and friends as a true gentleman.

 

You can see the full list of recipients on the Government of Saskatchewan’s website.

Reminder: Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan Consultation

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The Law Reform Commission of Saskatchewan recently posted a new consultation report on life lease legislation on its website. This consultation report asks whether Saskatchewan should enact legislation on life leases, and if so, what types of provisions should be included. The Commission relies on responses received during consultation to inform its recommendations. Responses can be provided in writing or as answers to the online survey. Both the survey and the consultation report can be found at: https://lawreformcommission.sk.ca

The consultation period has been extended to September 30, 2019.

Follow the Trail of Your Legal Research Activity on Lexbox

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By Alisa Lazear; reblogged with permission from the CanLII Blog

Lexbox is a free tool designed to help you keep track of your legal research online that has been integrated into CanLII.

Lexbox folders are there to keep track of your research, but you may get caught up in a complex search query and forget to save a document or not realize you needed it until later.

The Lexbox “Recent History” feature can help you backtrack your research activity so you can access those documents you may have discarded. The feature was designed for legal researchers to look for a search they performed or a document they previously visited.

You can use the Lexbox search history feature to:

  • Find a discarded search result
  • Reload a complex search query that was not saved into one of your folders
  • Track time spent on supported websites for billing purposes.

Keep in mind that you have the full control over the recording in Recent History:

  • The tracking of your Recent History can be enabled or disabled from your Lexbox profile.  It is enabled by default.

  • Lexbox records your history for up to 30 days. You can delete all the items recorded in your Recent History, or individual items, at any time.

Legislative Update

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The following regulations were published in The Saskatchewan Gazette, Part II, Vol. 115 No. 24, June 14, 2019:

  • E-13.1 Reg 12 The Executive Government Administration Exemption Regulations
  • F-13.4 Reg 40 The Petroleum Innovation Incentive Regulations
  • F-13.4 Reg 41 The Oil and Gas Processing Investment Incentive Regulations

Gladue Rights Research Database Free and Open

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The Gladue Rights Research Database provides lawyers, researchers and others with instant access to the insights and conclusions of more than 500 academic works related to the history of settler colonialism in Saskatchewan. It also includes a large and growing body of oral history resources and key archival documents.

The database, which was officially launched last May and was supported by the Law Foundation of Saskatchewan, is the product of a partnership between Legal Aid Saskatchewan, the Community-Engaged History Collaboratorium (U of S Department of History) and the U of S Humanities and Fine Arts Digital Research Centre. While originally offered on a subscription basis, open access to the database has been made possible through the generosity of the Law Society of Saskatchewan, Legal Aid Saskatchewan, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Corrections and Policing, and the Community-engaged History Collaboratorium, Department of History, at the University of Saskatchewan.

Gladue reports are pre-sentencing or bail hearing reports stemming from a landmark 1999 Supreme Court of Canada decision, based on a section of the Criminal Code, advising lower courts to consider Indigenous offenders’ backgrounds during sentencing. The reports can contain recommendations to a court on an appropriate sentence and provide details about the impacts of settler colonialism on an Indigenous person’s background, such as residential school history, physical or sexual abuse, interactions with the child welfare system, addictions and other health issues.

The database will contribute to the goals articulated by Canada’s Supreme Court, including reducing the number of Indigenous people sentenced to serve time in correctional facilities. It will accomplish this in several ways, such as by making Gladue reports—which can cost between $6,000 and $8,000 each in British Columbia—easier to prepare and less expensive for Indigenous people and their legal counsel in Saskatchewan.

The database is a robust and growing resource that has been built by Indigenous and non-Indigenous students at the U of S, working under faculty mentorship. It builds capacity within the justice system toward meeting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s calls to action regarding education about the history of colonialism as it relates to Indigenous people in Canada.

The database is the first of its kind in Canada and other jurisdictions may replicate this innovative tool in the future. The stakeholders involved in the development and continued maintenance of the database are proud to support such a worthwhile and beneficial project.