Subject Resource Guide – Family Law (Tip of the Week)

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By Alan Kilpatrick

The Family Law Subject Resource Guide is now available online at the at Research Resources  area of the Law Society website.

Subject resource guides provide the titles of key texts, ebooks, CPD materials, journals, legal encyclopedias, and provincial and federal legislation for a particular area of the law.  They are guides to finding the best resources for an area of the law.  The guides are intended to be used by those starting new legal research projects and to ensure that obvious resources are not missed.

Other subject guides available at Research Resources include:

The Law Society Library will continue to develop subject resource lists in every area of legal practice on a regular basis.

Lawyers Weekly

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lawyersweeklyBy Melanie Hodges Neufeld

The February 17th edition of Lawyers Weekly digital edition is now available via the Members’ Section of the Law Society website. Articles in this issue include:

  • Supreme Court heard fewer cases, was more divided, in past year
  • Karakatsanis played major role for court
  • Family Law: Mandating Counselling
  • Securities Law: Shareholder activism news
  • Business & Careers: The value of feedback

Rare Fish

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rarefishBy Ken Fox

We at the library consider it a certainty that in due time all case law (as well as statutes and out-of-copyright textbooks) will eventually be available for free online. When exactly that happens in a particular case depends on many factors – the size of the collection, availability of copies, ownership of content, levels of interest, etc.

In the case of the Fisheries Pollution Reports, produced in five volumes from 1980 to 1992 by Environment Canada, the rarity of the reports has spawned their digitization. Digitization accomplishes two main goals: preservation and accessibility. A single copy of any rare book can feed the entire world.

Thus, with only a couple of copies remaining in Canadian libraries to serve all requests, the University of Toronto Bora Baskin Law Library and York University’s Osgoode Hall have partnered to make this endangered fish abundant once again.

The reports are hosted on Archive.org, a site created by Grateful Dead fans to share concert recordings online. But Archive.org has now become the De facto Internet archive, the default place where dead things come to life.

The reports, at first glance, are not easy to read – they display sideways, and the print is faint. Probably the best way to read them is to scroll down to the “Download Options” and click on PDF. There are other options, but that’s the one I chose. The file displays upright, and is clearly readable. You can also print pages, or download a copy to your computer, then open it in Adobe Reader.

If you know of other digitization projects  that we should be talking about, please let us know.

Office of the Residential Tenancies Video Series

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By Alan Kilpatrick

The Saskatchewan Office of Residential Tenancies (ORT), the independent agency that rules on disputes between tenants and landlords in the province, recently created a short YouTube video to help prepare those attending ORT hearings.  The video addresses how to prepare for a hearing and what to expect there.  It appears to be the first in a series of videos from the ORT aimed at helping landlords and tenants.

We are looking forward to additional videos from the ORT in the future.

More information about ORT hearings can be found on PLEA.org.

ort

New Journals in the Library – January 2017 #1

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By Sarah Roussel-Lewis

The Advocate
Volume 75, Part 1

  • Reconciliation – A Lawyering Imperative / Karey Brooks
  • Three Good Reasons Why UNDRIP Can’t Be Law – And One Good Reason Why It Can / Gib van Ert
  • Reforming Arbitration Appeals: The New ULCC Uniform Arbitration Act / William G. Horton
  • The First Bite is No Longer Free: new Legislation Proposes Changes to a Dog Owner’s Liability / Amanda James
  • Let the Sky Fall: Lawyers in the History of British Columbia Mountaineering – Part I – The Mountains / David Crerar, Anders Ourom, and Harry Crerar

 

Canadian Family Law Quarterly
Volume 36, Number 1 (December 2016)

  • Children Resisting Contact: What’s a Lawyer to Do? / Nicholas Bala and Patricia Hebert
  • Spousal Pension Benefits: When Death does not Them do Part / Rita M. Richardson
  • Valuation of Professional Practices / Steve Ranot
  • Proxy-mate: Revitalizing the Spousal Support Regime for Non-conjugal Adult Personal Relationships and the Case of Caregiving / Katherine-Spensieri

 

Canadian Tax Journal
Volume 64, Number 4 (2016)

  • The Next Phase of Life Insurance Policyholder Taxation Is Nigh / Kevin Wark and Michael O’Connor
  • The Tax Compliance Costs of Large Corporations: An Empirical Inquiry and Comparative Analysis / Chris Evans, Philip Lignier, and Binh Tran-Nam
  • Finances of the Nation: Inside the Black Box: Marginal Effective Tax Rates on Capital in Canada – A Primer
  • Current Cases: (FCA) Kruger Incorporated v. Canada; (TCC) Gerbro Holdings Company v. The Queen
  • International Tax Planning: Is the Back-to-Back Withholding Tax Regime an Effective Anti-Treaty-Shopping Measure?
  • Personal Tax Planning / Planification fiscal personnelle: Investing in Residential Real Estate / Investir dans le secteur immobilier résidentiel
  • Corporate Tax Planning: Legal Ownership Versus Economic Substance: OECD Perspectives and Practical
  • Selected US Tax Development: Onerous US Reporting Requirements for US Members of Non-US Family-Controlled Entities: It’s All in the Family

 

Dalhousie Law Journal
Volume 39, Number 2 (Fall 2016)

  • Imagining Global Health with Justice / Lawrence O. Gostin
  • A Goal-Oriented Understanding of the Right to Health Care and its implications for Future Health Rights Litigation / Michael Da Silva
  • Modernizing the Canada Health Act / Colleen M. Flood and Bryan Thomas
  • And Miles to Go Before I Sleep: The Future of End-of-Life Law and Policy in Canada / Jocelyn Downie
  • Informing the Future of End-of-Life Care in Canada: Lessons from the Quebec Legislative Experience / Michelle Giroux
  • Cross-Cultural Dynamics in palliative Care: The Emerging Canadian Scenario / Chidi Oguamanam
  • A Consumer Protection Perspective on Regulation for Healthier Eating / Barbara von Tigerstrom
  • Aboriginal Consultation in Canadian Water Negotiations: The Mackenzie Bilateral Water Management Agreements / Andrea Beck
  • DNA, Donor Offspring and Derivative Citizenship: Redefining Parentage Under the Citizenship Act / Stefanie Carsley
  • Out of the Black Hole: Toward a Fresh Approach to Tort Causation / Allan C. Hutchinson
  • The Doctrine of Lost Modern Grant and Prescriptive Easements in Newfoundland / Greg French

Appropriate Dispute Resolution Survey – Last day!

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By Kim Newsham
Innovation and Strategic Initiatives, Ministry of Justice

If you haven’t done this survey yet, today is the last day!

The Ministry of Justice is considering making some form of Appropriate Dispute Resolution (ADR) mandatory before parties can proceed with a family law application.  ADR could include mediation, collaborative law, and separation/divorce coaching.  Exceptions to the requirement may be needed.  The Ministry has been consulting with stakeholders since August 2016 and continues to do so.  The Ministry is hoping to obtain as much feedback as possible before determining whether to proceed with legislative amendments.  Your participation is critical to the success of this project.  Please consider completing a short survey which is available at:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/YJKBNGV

The survey will be open until February 13th.  Individual survey results will be kept confidential; data will be used in aggregated form only.  If you have any questions about the survey, or if you wish to review the consultation document and provide written comments, please contact Kim Newsham at kim.newsham@gov.sk.ca or at 306-787-5709.